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Article FS00/5
FENG SHUI GUIDELINES ABOUT INTERIORS OF HOMES

Prof. Dr. Ong Hean-Tatt September 2000


Disclaimer: The guidelines given here are for intellectual interest only. Those who want to apply Feng Shui should consult experienced Feng Shui practitioners.



Arrangements within Home

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Feng Shui inside the Home

The overall principle inside the home is that the depressing effects of lack of space, sunlight, tree and water must be countered. One should walk into a wide bright room with an expansive and happy feeling. This will encourage constructive and unburdened expression.

The first impression on entering a house has primary influence on the person's attitude and success. Thus, the Chinese saying is that if you entered a place and have agood feeling, that place is good Feng Shui for you!

After that, the effects of the interior depend on the sense of balance.

Should the home be located in a very bad Feng Shui spot, it may not be possible to counter the bad Feng Shui by manipulating the Feng Shui of the interior. Only a very righteous person can live in such a spot, for all demons fear the righteous soul.


Lights, Plants, Water

There should be no dark rooms or halls. Use light to brighten up any dark spots. Brightness is a "yang" force and stimulates a person's "ch'i".

However, objects used to create light must not be obstructive, like hanging a chandelier too low, otherwise, they defeat the purpose.

Attractive plants serve in the same way as light to increase positive "ch'i". They are capable of countering the bad Feng Shui of sharp corners and unattractive spots. Growing above the bed, plants increase "ch'i".

The presence of water means money. Places with views of pleasant water bodies have good Feng Shui. Fish tanks stimulate the effects of water.

The only water feature which must be avoided is the washroom. While necessary for toilet purposes, they should be kept out of view of important functional areas, especially business areas.


Entrances

The entrance should give the boardest view of the interior, so that nothing inside is hidden. This way, the "ch'i" flows everywhere, leaving no isolated spot for bad "ch'i" to accumulate.

Entrances leading into narrow halls or corridors stifle the "ch'i".

Contradiction: Entrances confronted by walls also suffer from confinement of "ch'i". This view is conflicting with the concept of the door screen. The door screen is often placed inside the house in front of the main door to provide some sense of privacy for the home. This door screen is sometimes decorated with auspicious motifs to bless the home and to ward off evil.

Remedy for confined entrances: Put up a bright light. Place a poster or mirror to create "space".


Direction faced by Entrance

The fortune of the home may be influenced by which of eight sides of the "Pakua" pattern the entrance is oriented, as follows (similar principle for arrangement of rooms in house):

Northern boundary

  • Centre = career, business success
  • Right (north-west) = helpers, travel, international
  • Left (north-east) = knowledge, scholar

Southern boundary

  • Centre = fame
  • Right (south-west) = marriage
  • Left (soputh-east) = wealth

Eastern boundary, centre = family life
Western boundary, centre = children and their fame

Contradiction: The above "Pakua" principle that entrance facing north-east favours knowledge and scholars has a little contradiction - doors must not face north-east, the "devil's gate", otherwise, ill luck will enter the home. [Author's deduction: The hidden solution is that "knowledge is sacred" and the scholar automatically has an aura which repels the demons].


First Impressions on Entry

People often judge by first impressions. It is not different in Feng Shui.

If the kitchen is visible from the hall door, people will only think of eating. [This effect will also be found in some houses built to enter passing a ktichen before coming into the hall].

If the washroom is too visible from the entrance and even hall, people will think only going to toilet. This also usually means sickness.

The washroom is a place where "wealth drains away" and should never face or be near a business area. It must never be in line with the main door.

The kitchen and washroom should be placed as far as possible away from each other. Otherwise, keep the washroom door close and place a "Pakua" mirror over the washroom's door to block malign forces from the washroom to affect the kitchen.

[A much more subtle first impression is when a person enters to face a wall before passing into the hall. The features of the hall are seen only by one of the two eyes. If the wall is via the left door, then the left eye is blocked and the person is a right thinker - meaning he will be too emotional. If the wall is via the right door, the person is a left thinker - he will be too analytical, that is cold and harsh. That is why the ancient homes have a central entry door to ensure both eyes see in the hall.

Remedy: Put a picture or plant or flower arrangement at the wall. This "extends" the field of vision, harmonises the wall with the hall and allows both eyes to "see"]


Doors and Windows

Avoid three or more doors or windows in a row. The "ch'i" flows out too fast.

If the front door has a direct view of another door or widow at the back the "ch'i" will also flow out fast.

Remedy: put up a mobile wind-chime to trap and disperse the "ch'i" before it could go out. Or, hang a beaded curtain from the inside door or window.

Opposite doors or windows should align with each other, otherwise they lead to "bad biting habits" and quarrels. Remedy for unalign doors or windows is to have mirrors or pictures to "extend" the doors to align with each other.

Never have slanted doors. Remedy: The shape of the slanted door should be altered with a suitable line made by a wood piece or curtain string to look more regular.

Windows facing unpleasant sights or religious locations are usually closed. Chinese sometimes block off windows from good views for Feng Shui reason. For example, windows facing west may be closed for the simple reason that the afternoon sun glare is oppressive.

Doors must be more impressive than windows. Remedy: where large and many windows may overshadow a door, place a chime at the door. The chime sounds when the door is opened, adding "ch'i" to the door.


BEAMS AND PROJECTIONS

Contradiction: Low beams burden prosperity and growth and should be avoided. They stifle the circulation of "ch'i". Yet, Chinese temples are full of beams.

A beam above a table, be it a dinning table or buisiness desk, acts like a knife cutting down and is therefore a divisive influence. Remedy: Put two flutes with red ribbons hanging slanting in the middle of the beam to create a "Pakua" pattern which is auspicious. Or, place a lamp or overhead mirror in the middle of the beam. Another remedy is to create an artificial ceiling, concealing the beam.

Sharp corners jutting into rooms should be avoided. The remedy for a sharp corner is to place a long hanging decoration to hide the corner.


Stairs

Stairs allow free-flow of "ch'i" between the top and bottom floors. They should not be narrow and confining.

The ideal stairs should curve into the hall.

The straight stairs facing the door is the worst, allowing "ch'i" to run straight out through the door.

Banisters with sharp edges should be avoided.

Stairs should be brightly lit, especially at nights.


ROOMS ARRANGEMENTS

A major principle of rooms is that the main user must at a location where he can see all who comes in. This position is usually cater-corner to the door.


Room Shapes

Some room shapes look like a knife or boot. Never sleep on the "knife edge" or along the "sole of the boot", nor place a desk or stove. A remedy is to place a mirror on the wall opposite the "knife edge" or "sole" wall - the mirror draws away the "ch'i" from the dangerous edge.


Bedrooms

The Chinese do not sleep with the feet towards the door, as this is the dead man's position.

The bed should be placed cater-corner to the door, so that the bed person can see whoever comes in. Beds should rest against the wall, to get the "solid" backing.
Contradictions: The ancient bedroom had the bed directly opposite the door! The bed was placed sideward against the wall, so that the head-feet axis was parallel to the wall i.e. there was no "solid backing" for the head!

Heavy furnitures should not be placed next to the bed, otherwise they will opporess those sleeping on the bed.

During pregnancy, do not move bed nor dust under it.


Direction faced by Bed (feet)

The fortune of the person sleeping on the bed may be influenced by which of eight sides of the "Pakua" pattern the entrance is oriented, as follows (similar principle for arrangement of rooms in house):

Northern boundary

  • Centre = career, business success
  • Right (north-west) = helpers, travel, international
  • Left (north-east) = knowledge, scholar

Southern boundary

  • Centre = fame
  • Right (south-west) = marriage
  • Left (soputh-east) = wealth

Eastern boundary, centre = family life
Western boundary, centre = children and their fame

Contradiction: The above "Pakua" principle that entrance facing north-east favours knowledge and scholars has a little contradiction - doors must not face north-east, the "devil's gate", otherwise, ill luck will enter the home. [Author's deduction: The hidden solution is that "knowledge is sacred" and the scholar automatically has an aura which repels the demons].


Living Room

As living rooms are receiving rooms for guests, they have less importance. But living rooms should be light, large and devoid of Feng Shui bad features like beams, corners, odd shapes.

The host's favorite chair should face the door.

The living room is also a good place to place good luck symbols.


Kitchens

The most important feature of the kitchen is said to be the stove, which signifies fortune.

The stove must not be in cramp corner, but gives the cook room to move about.

The cook shold be able to see whoever comes into the kitchen.


Studies and Offices

Desks should be placed cater-corner to the door, so that occupants face the door.

The manager should sit with a commanding view of his staff. Contradiction: The ruler's position was always centre, not cater-corner!

If, to overlook a window view, a person sits with the door behind, a mirror should be placed to allow a view of people coming through the door.

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Wrong arrangements of things within the home can be dangerous

Find out here!


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